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Do you know how many Indian space objects are currently in orbit? Here’s the answer

Do you know how many Indian space objects are currently in orbit? Here’s the answer


Welcome to World Action aand Reaction News,
todays News is. Do you know how many Indian space objects
are currently in orbit? Here’s the answer Indian space industry has been flourishing
and giving its oversees rivals a tough competition. It has not only created a mark in the space
world but has also set examples for others to follow. As of April 1, 2017, a total of 192 Indian
objects are orbiting in space, catalogued by US Space Surveillance Network, said a retired
Indian scientist. He was citing the August 2017 issue of “Orbital
Debris”, a quarterly published by NASA. “Space objects include functional satellites
as well as debris. The term catalogued means the space objects
are tracked, updated, and their orbits are determined. The US and Russia maintain the catalogues
as they have the technical capabilities,” M.Y.S. Prasad, a former Director of the Satish Dhawan
Space Centre (SDSC), told IANS. The Indian navigation satellite IRNSS-1H stuck
inside the heat shield of PSLV-XL rocket that was launched on August 31 is the latest in
orbit. Officials of the Indian Space Research Organisation
(ISRO) said the navigation satellite-heat shield assembly — together weighing around
2.4-tonnes — now tumbling in outer space, is expected to re-enter the earth`s atmosphere
in a couple of months. According to Prasad, the present global capability
of tracking the space debris is objects of bigger than 1-metre in GEO (geostationary
equatorial orbit), and bigger than 10 cm in LEO (low earth orbit). Prasad said the limitation is due to the sizing
and capability of ground tracking systems. The objects in GEO are tracked by optical
telescopes while those in LEO are tracked by radars. In India, the multi-object tracking radar
(MOTR) set up at the SDSC in Sriharikota is one of the biggest radars in the world for
tracking space debris, Prasad added. He said MOTR is designed to track 50cm X50cm
debris at a slant range of 1,000 km, and 30cm x 30cm debris at a slant range of 800 km and
most of the debris, which cause damage to operational satellites can easily be tracked.

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

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